by UNDP Europe and Central Asia

                                  

What is STEM4ALL?

The STEM4ALL platform uses knowledge and advocacy to advance gender equality in the workplace in the men-dominated growth industry sectors of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) across Europe and Central Asia. For economies to prosper, and for women to participate and benefit from them on an equal footing with men, new STEM pathways must be forged, from classroom to career. Businesses, governments, academia, and civil society organizations are encouraged to use this platform to learn and collaborate to design new solutions that dismantle gender-based barriers to STEM-related work.

 

Here you can learn about the key barriers to women’s entry and progression through STEM careers; see a snapshot of the status of women in STEM labor markets in each country of the region (where reliable data is available); and access some of the region’s best practices confronting and diminishing gender inequalities within the work environments of STEM-related businesses from a range of perspectives across Europe and Central Asia.

About the platform

Source: Human Resources in R&D UIS Statistics.  Latest data available is no older than 2014; Data accessed on December 29, 2020.

The future of work

The future of work

The Covid-19 pandemic has shaken the world of work to its core, forcing people to adapt and persevere in unprecedented ways. Prior to the pandemic, technology and globalization were already changing the nature of work, from creating jobs that require STEM skills to making current jobs obsolete. As women workers are employed predominantly in jobs requiring low STEM skills, they are 1.2 times more likely to be employed in an occupation at high risk of automation across all industries.


The pandemic is only accelerating the urgency to reskill and upskill the labour force as businesses pivot to survive and remain competitive. For economies to prosper, and for women to participate and benefit from them on an equal footing with men, new STEM pathways must be forged, from classroom to career.